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It is well known that I had a rough first year of college. I initially started this blog long ago to help me study towards bettering my grades. Well, since then I have switched majors (Microbiology, ftw) and have found myself in a very happy internship.

Regardless, I still find myself trying to come to ease with college in a hurry (two years down, one to go). There isn’t alot of help out there for science majors who struggle to balance everything that is important to them in life. Unfortunately, we have to make a lot of cuts in order to make our dreams come true.

I am having to quit my DnD group of close to two years because I have found that despite my incredible efforts towards garnering an A in my most difficult courses, I still fell short and I think the extra time Saturday evening for review (which I did loyally every Saturday in high school after a day of play and relaxation) is what I really need back.

So, here’s to a new start on education and a restarted blog to go along with it.

What to expect to see:
Lessons on Microbiology, Chemistry and college in general
Tips for the GRE
Tips for Graduate School
Occasional rants

Here’s to a good semester of summer courses!
Cheers,
Kitty

This past weekend, I had a rather full discussion with my boyfriend, Justin, about the rather gray line between chemistry and its adjacent fields (such as biology).  Recently, I acquired a job working in the medical buildings with a microbiology lab and have found myself at a loss of words in awe at how beautifully my education and past lab experiences will fit smoothly into my upcoming ones.  As we come flying hard and fast out of high school, our minds bewildered with the idea of adulthood, we often only glance at the possibilities before us with bemusement before diving headlong into majors, minors and the livelyhood that comes with the title “college student”.

Now that I sit happily in my last few semesters, I feel that “the earth is getting rather large in the window”, as my mom likes to quote to me from my favorite movie.  Today marks the last week of my time as a student working with an あるばと, or part-time job.  Next week, I shall blast forward into what will hopefully be the rest of my life.  That being as it may, I was considering how closely related all the mechanisms of science really are.

Membrane pump like this!  It should move too!Take, as Justin and I did, chemistry in relation to biology.  Truely, the focus is rather similar.  Some chemists (and especially biochemists, whom I feel stand directly on the line between the two fields and wave their hands like only a mad chemist could) study on the mechanisms that cause life to function.  An example could be: what chemical mechanism drives that ion pump in the cell’s membrane?  Some biologists, on the other hand, could look at that same ion pump and wonder what effect it has on the organism as a whole.

As chemists, we work with the building blocks of everything on earth.  The keys I’m typing with, the board my professor isHoly Shit!  Yep, that's Chemistry for you.  Big Booms.  Always. writing on, the chalk, my lab partner next to me.  All of these are made up of the chemicals that we, via definition, focus on.  I find this staggering.  There is so much I could do and see, learn and discover but only so many years in which to do so.  It is rather unfortunate and yet at least I know I shall always be employed!  Of course, my field is narrowed by a driven need to improve the human race and my love for medicinal chemistry.  (The internship I had a few years ago solidified that for me!)

I just find it phenomenal that each and every object about us all is made of tiny particles fluctuating with tiny bonds through minuscule electrons.

Anyways!  Since that was my second rant in a row, I promise to have a lesson of some sort ready for later this week.  Tune back in on Thursday for some good, ol’e fashioned, IUPAC organic nomenclature.  That’ll be fun, right?

Happy Chemistry,

The Alchemist Kitten

Currently, Kitten…

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Past Experiments